69.9 F
Columbus
Saturday, June 6, 2020
Board Game Reviews 1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review

1987 Channel Tunnel – Looping Games – Review

-

- Advertisment -1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 32

The mechanics in 1987 Channel Tunnel are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

John Doe

Jeremiah & Kara Clark

8.6/10
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 1

Theme and What is it?

9/10

It’s 1987. France and the United Kingdom have agreed to work together to construct an underground tunnel which will run beneath the English Channel, connecting their two countries. You have been appointed chief over your country’s half of the project, and they expect you to dig faster than your opponent. 

Yes, the two countries are technically working together, but just imagine the national pride one would gain for finishing their half of the tunnel first! Yes, someone will finish first– and you’re going to make sure it’s you.

In 1987 Channel Tunnel, players compete against each other, managing their underground workforces to bore through the heaps of earth that lie beneath the Channel. They’ll send their workers to get funding, develop better technology, gain the support of outside countries, and most importantly: dig. 

By strategically managing their workforce and building the better tableau of cards, one player will snatch the victory and secure the win for their country.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 2 1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 3

Gameplay Mechanics

10/10

1987 is a worker placement game with a fresh twist. At the beginning of the round, each player draws 10 colored disks out of a bag and places them in their player area. These are their workers. Workers of the same color are stacked on top of each other; when placing workers on actions, the entire stack of a single color must be sent. 

There are 5 action spaces in the game and a space occupied by a worker is blocked, unless you send a taller stack of workers there to bully them out of the way. Any worker disks that are bumped off this way go into the pool of the player who bumped them off. This is such an interesting spin because it means the more stacks you have the more actions you can take. It also means that if you have fewer, taller stacks, you’re more likely to be able to block your opponent, and less likely to be blocked yourself. 

Players can use their workers to move their TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) further into the channel, gain funding, develop new technology, scout ahead for potential trouble areas, or recruit special cards to their personal area.

Play continues back and forth, round by round, until one player completes their side of the channel. When this happens play immediately stops and the game is over. Players tally up their points to see who has the most, and whoever does is the winner!

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 4

Initial Impressions

9/10

A game about drilling an underground tunnel – isn’t that “boring”? (ba-dum-psh!) I didn’t have any expectations, but I had heard good things about it so I gave it a whirl. After the first round I was hooked. The turns were fast, the decisions were important, and the gameplay was extremely engaging.

There was this constant edge-of-your-seat tension as I agonized over which action space to take first. Each round was perfectly planned out in my head, but I knew that if my opponent blocked a certain action space my entire plan would be derailed. It made for some truly riveting gameplay.

One of my favorite aspects of the game is the drilling – the game ends when someone successfully tunnels their side of the Channel, but finishing your side first only gives you a handful of points. 

The goal of the game is to drill, but there are so many other things you need to do to play well: develop new technology, gain support from other countries, etc. The faster you tunnel the sooner the game ends, and you need to make sure you’re ready when it does.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 5

Game Build Quality

6/10

As with most small-box games, the build isn’t great. There are a lot of cards and tokens, but no Insert to hold everything in place. The Channel Tunnel “board” is made of side-by-side cards with little tokens resting on top, and the game box is a little thin.

 It’s not all bad though – the game comes with a cloth bag for holding all the brightly colored worker chips, and each player has a custom TBM meeple. The two player boards are surprisingly sturdy, and all the components fit nicely in the small box.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 6

Artistic Direction

8/10

1987 Channel Tunnel has a lot of symbology: On the action spaces, on the cards, on the player boards – it’s everywhere! Luckily, the genius designers were able to condense the entire symbology system down to less than 10 different symbols. This makes the entire system incredibly easy to understand, because you don’t have to memorize an entire picture-language to play the game.

Every inch of the player boards are utilized. The top has rubble-storage spaces, and the bottom has the technology advancement track. The backs of the boards are beautifully illustrated: one with France’s flag, the other with the Union Jack. The cards are also nicely illustrated. The rulebook is dotted with interesting history tidbits — I felt smarter and more cultured after I had read it, so that was a nice bonus.

My favorite artistic decision the designers made is the channel board. The board is made of 6 rail cards laid side-by-side. The rails are covered with face-down rubble tokens, and the backs of the tokens look like water. This is the artistic icing on top of the design cake, because as your TBM plows through the rubble, the rail lines appear, giving you the idea that you actually are building an underwater railway. This simple decision enhances the theme so much – I absolutely love it.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 7

Fun Factor

9/10

Ever since we played  this game, I’ve been itching to play it again. The turns are quick, but they are important. You need to do several actions, but you can only take one per turn. Which should you take first? Which are you afraid your opponent will block? 

There’s an awesome feeling of tension as you watch your rival pick up a large stack of workers, and you just hope they don’t block the spot you were hoping to take on yours. It feels like a race as your TBMs inch up the channel, trying to outpace each other — or at least not fall too far behind. 

In the end only one player will earn the title “king of boring”, but both players will feel immensely satisfied as they look back over everything they’ve accomplished during the game.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 8

Age Range & Weight

9/10

The manufacturer recommended age for 1987 Channel Tunnel is 12+, and I think once they understand the symbols, a 12-year-old could really enjoy this game. The mechanics are streamlined, and the symbology is clear which helps gameplay putter right along.

I would say this is a medium-weight game. The mechanics are really simple, but a good strategy requires some forward thinking, and quick adaptation when things go awry.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 9

Conclusions

8.57/10

1987 Channel Tunnel is a brilliant 2-player game with a clever spin on worker placement. The mechanics are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

For anyone looking for a great 2-player game, take a look at 1987 Channel Tunnel!

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 10
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 15

The mechanics in 1987 Channel Tunnel are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

The mechanics in 1987 Channel Tunnel are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

John Doe

Jeremiah & Kara Clark

8.6/10
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 16

Theme and What is it?

9/10

It’s 1987. France and the United Kingdom have agreed to work together to construct an underground tunnel which will run beneath the English Channel, connecting their two countries. You have been appointed chief over your country’s half of the project, and they expect you to dig faster than your opponent. 

Yes, the two countries are technically working together, but just imagine the national pride one would gain for finishing their half of the tunnel first! Yes, someone will finish first– and you’re going to make sure it’s you.

In 1987 Channel Tunnel, players compete against each other, managing their underground workforces to bore through the heaps of earth that lie beneath the Channel. They’ll send their workers to get funding, develop better technology, gain the support of outside countries, and most importantly: dig. 

By strategically managing their workforce and building the better tableau of cards, one player will snatch the victory and secure the win for their country.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 17 1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 18

Gameplay Mechanics

10/10

1987 is a worker placement game with a fresh twist. At the beginning of the round, each player draws 10 colored disks out of a bag and places them in their player area. These are their workers. Workers of the same color are stacked on top of each other; when placing workers on actions, the entire stack of a single color must be sent. 

There are 5 action spaces in the game and a space occupied by a worker is blocked, unless you send a taller stack of workers there to bully them out of the way. Any worker disks that are bumped off this way go into the pool of the player who bumped them off. This is such an interesting spin because it means the more stacks you have the more actions you can take. It also means that if you have fewer, taller stacks, you’re more likely to be able to block your opponent, and less likely to be blocked yourself. 

Players can use their workers to move their TBM (Tunnel Boring Machine) further into the channel, gain funding, develop new technology, scout ahead for potential trouble areas, or recruit special cards to their personal area.

Play continues back and forth, round by round, until one player completes their side of the channel. When this happens play immediately stops and the game is over. Players tally up their points to see who has the most, and whoever does is the winner!

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 19

Initial Impressions

9/10

A game about drilling an underground tunnel – isn’t that “boring”? (ba-dum-psh!) I didn’t have any expectations, but I had heard good things about it so I gave it a whirl. After the first round I was hooked. The turns were fast, the decisions were important, and the gameplay was extremely engaging.

There was this constant edge-of-your-seat tension as I agonized over which action space to take first. Each round was perfectly planned out in my head, but I knew that if my opponent blocked a certain action space my entire plan would be derailed. It made for some truly riveting gameplay.

One of my favorite aspects of the game is the drilling – the game ends when someone successfully tunnels their side of the Channel, but finishing your side first only gives you a handful of points. 

The goal of the game is to drill, but there are so many other things you need to do to play well: develop new technology, gain support from other countries, etc. The faster you tunnel the sooner the game ends, and you need to make sure you’re ready when it does.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 20

Game Build Quality

6/10

As with most small-box games, the build isn’t great. There are a lot of cards and tokens, but no Insert to hold everything in place. The Channel Tunnel “board” is made of side-by-side cards with little tokens resting on top, and the game box is a little thin.

 It’s not all bad though – the game comes with a cloth bag for holding all the brightly colored worker chips, and each player has a custom TBM meeple. The two player boards are surprisingly sturdy, and all the components fit nicely in the small box.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 21

Artistic Direction

8/10

1987 Channel Tunnel has a lot of symbology: On the action spaces, on the cards, on the player boards – it’s everywhere! Luckily, the genius designers were able to condense the entire symbology system down to less than 10 different symbols. This makes the entire system incredibly easy to understand, because you don’t have to memorize an entire picture-language to play the game.

Every inch of the player boards are utilized. The top has rubble-storage spaces, and the bottom has the technology advancement track. The backs of the boards are beautifully illustrated: one with France’s flag, the other with the Union Jack. The cards are also nicely illustrated. The rulebook is dotted with interesting history tidbits — I felt smarter and more cultured after I had read it, so that was a nice bonus.

My favorite artistic decision the designers made is the channel board. The board is made of 6 rail cards laid side-by-side. The rails are covered with face-down rubble tokens, and the backs of the tokens look like water. This is the artistic icing on top of the design cake, because as your TBM plows through the rubble, the rail lines appear, giving you the idea that you actually are building an underwater railway. This simple decision enhances the theme so much – I absolutely love it.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 22

Fun Factor

9/10

Ever since we played  this game, I’ve been itching to play it again. The turns are quick, but they are important. You need to do several actions, but you can only take one per turn. Which should you take first? Which are you afraid your opponent will block? 

There’s an awesome feeling of tension as you watch your rival pick up a large stack of workers, and you just hope they don’t block the spot you were hoping to take on yours. It feels like a race as your TBMs inch up the channel, trying to outpace each other — or at least not fall too far behind. 

In the end only one player will earn the title “king of boring”, but both players will feel immensely satisfied as they look back over everything they’ve accomplished during the game.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 23

Age Range & Weight

9/10

The manufacturer recommended age for 1987 Channel Tunnel is 12+, and I think once they understand the symbols, a 12-year-old could really enjoy this game. The mechanics are streamlined, and the symbology is clear which helps gameplay putter right along.

I would say this is a medium-weight game. The mechanics are really simple, but a good strategy requires some forward thinking, and quick adaptation when things go awry.

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 24

Conclusions

8.57/10

1987 Channel Tunnel is a brilliant 2-player game with a clever spin on worker placement. The mechanics are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

For anyone looking for a great 2-player game, take a look at 1987 Channel Tunnel!

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 25
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review
1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 30

The mechanics in 1987 Channel Tunnel are simple, but beneath the streamlined exterior lie some crunchy decisions and rock-solid gameplay. 

1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 31
Jeremiah & Kara Clark
Shortly after we got married we were introduced by our next door neighbors to designer board games. And we were immediately hooked! Since then we’ve been able to play hundreds of different games over the years, and we still can’t get enough. It’s been great having a hobby that we can both share together, and it’s a blast to explore all the different types of games, especially since we each have our own unique tastes in games.

Latest news

Top 10 Games to Play when Stuck at Home

.ugb-11e1589 .ugb-blockquote__quote{width:70px !important;height:70px !important}

Fantasy Pug Quest – Tin Hat Games – Review

PublisherDesignerArtistGame TypeDatesAge RangePlaytimePlaycount Tin...
- Advertisement -1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 341987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 35

Spies and Lies: A Stratego Story – Jumbo – Review

Spies and Lies: A Stratego Story is a nice little 2 player game.

Maximum Apocalypse RPG – Rock Manor Games – Preview

Facebook Twitter Instagram The real strength of this game is the systems used for character and world creation. Steve...

Must read

Top 10 Games to Play when Stuck at Home

.ugb-11e1589 .ugb-blockquote__quote{width:70px...

Top 10 Player Pawns

One of those rare moments where we put on...
- Advertisement -1987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 361987 Channel Tunnel - Looping Games - Review 34

You might also likeRELATED
Recommended to you