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Board Game Reviews Bottom of the Ninth - Dice Hate Me -...

Bottom of the Ninth – Dice Hate Me – Review

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Theme & What is it?
8.9
Gameplay Mechanics
6.1
Initial Impressions
5.3
Game Build Quality
9.3
Artistic Direction
9.7
Fun Factor
8.3
Age Range
9.3
Overall
8.3

Hey batter battter…

There is no joy in Mudville Mighty Stacey has struck out. Since in this COVID-19 period, no one will take me out to the ballgame, so I have brought it home, with some cracker jack.
Josh
– That Josh
  • Sports
  • Bluffing
  • Dice Chucking
  • Crowdfund Date: 2014
  • Official Publication Date/ Street Date: 2015
  • 13+
  • 5-20 Minutes
  • 1-2

Bottom of the ninth is a game about the stress of the last few pitches of a tied baseball game. You are either playing pitcher or batter, and the game forces you to think about what players on the diamond think about during these most stressful moments, in a way that no full baseball game ever could. You are, the mighty Casey.

The game is a lot like asking someone which hand you have a quarter in twice. Ultimately, this ain’t rocket science. But that is almost irrelevant at the irreverence of it. This is just baseball goodness. You will take two coins as the pitcher and two as the batter. The pitcher wants no matches, the batter wants both to match. You get bonuses based on how well you both guessed. Now you pitch with dice, if the batter BEATS the number of the pitcher, he gets on base, absent other rule modifiers. You are as the batter, only trying to get ONE single person home. As the pitcher, you are trying to get three outs. This is the entire game. Win, or lose, in those last moments.

I have a mental block when it comes to sports board games. I am sure many of you may as well. This is a prime example of why I should not judge a game by theme alone. I would have been far too harsh.

The game is built solidly with a mixture of nice wood, nice dice, a small board that actually fits in the small box, and of course the compulsory running meeples. I have to say if quality alone were an indication of whether I would like a game, this would get an astounding two snaps in a circle.

The art feels like a baseball diamond. I had some nostalia and feels over this game. I was actually pretty surprised based on how much I am not a huge fan of sports board games in general. This art was nearly perfect in its execution. I really like the look and feel of all of it.

Do you like those stressful last moments of ANY game when you are nearly tied? This game makes that the ENTIRE game. The tense feel is definitely there, and for that reason alone, I would suggest this to any other person who enjoys biting their finger nails at the end of a sportsball game, I certainly do.

13+. I would generally agree with this, as it is a game about little rule exceptions. A younger person would like the mini-games that comprise the bulk of the game, but may never use the powers effectively to eek out a win.

My main issue with this game is that there is a lot of the illusion of choice. When you choose, there is no real reason to do so, it is luck. As is the dice roll. Some of the special powers are even compulsory in how they take effect. With that being said, I REALLY like Bottom of the Ninth. Sometimes the illusion of choice is the choice to just play something fun, and this game is that, in strikes and balls. Now to get my grubby mitts on the Clubhouse Expansion…

Hey batter battter…

There is no joy in Mudville Mighty Stacey has struck out. Since in this COVID-19 period, no one will take me out to the ballgame, so I have brought it home, with some cracker jack.
Josh
– That Josh
  • Sports
  • Bluffing
  • Dice Chucking
  • Crowdfund Date: 2014
  • Official Publication Date/ Street Date: 2015
  • 13+
  • 5-20 Minutes
  • 1-2

Bottom of the ninth is a game about the stress of the last few pitches of a tied baseball game. You are either playing pitcher or batter, and the game forces you to think about what players on the diamond think about during these most stressful moments, in a way that no full baseball game ever could. You are, the mighty Casey.

The game is a lot like asking someone which hand you have a quarter in twice. Ultimately, this ain’t rocket science. But that is almost irrelevant at the irreverence of it. This is just baseball goodness. You will take two coins as the pitcher and two as the batter. The pitcher wants no matches, the batter wants both to match. You get bonuses based on how well you both guessed. Now you pitch with dice, if the batter BEATS the number of the pitcher, he gets on base, absent other rule modifiers. You are as the batter, only trying to get ONE single person home. As the pitcher, you are trying to get three outs. This is the entire game. Win, or lose, in those last moments.

I have a mental block when it comes to sports board games. I am sure many of you may as well. This is a prime example of why I should not judge a game by theme alone. I would have been far too harsh.

The game is built solidly with a mixture of nice wood, nice dice, a small board that actually fits in the small box, and of course the compulsory running meeples. I have to say if quality alone were an indication of whether I would like a game, this would get an astounding two snaps in a circle.

The art feels like a baseball diamond. I had some nostalia and feels over this game. I was actually pretty surprised based on how much I am not a huge fan of sports board games in general. This art was nearly perfect in its execution. I really like the look and feel of all of it.

Do you like those stressful last moments of ANY game when you are nearly tied? This game makes that the ENTIRE game. The tense feel is definitely there, and for that reason alone, I would suggest this to any other person who enjoys biting their finger nails at the end of a sportsball game, I certainly do.

13+. I would generally agree with this, as it is a game about little rule exceptions. A younger person would like the mini-games that comprise the bulk of the game, but may never use the powers effectively to eek out a win.

My main issue with this game is that there is a lot of the illusion of choice. When you choose, there is no real reason to do so, it is luck. As is the dice roll. Some of the special powers are even compulsory in how they take effect. With that being said, I REALLY like Bottom of the Ninth. Sometimes the illusion of choice is the choice to just play something fun, and this game is that, in strikes and balls. Now to get my grubby mitts on the Clubhouse Expansion…

Bottom of the Ninth - Dice Hate Me - Review 3
Joshhttps://hlgcal.com
Josh Hale is an avid TT gamer and loves the process of learning something new not by reading directions, but by playing through a round. He also is a single father and lawyer, so staying busy is never a problem.

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