Dodoresque – Tetrahedron Games – Review

"In the sphere of art themification (I made that word up, take that Shakespheare!), there is no higher praise in game art, than saying the art fits the theme, and makes the game better. Dodoresque does this perfectly."

Theme and What is it?

If only there was an adventure games, featuring dodos… Come Dodoresque. 

In this unique interpretation of a missions game, Tetrahedron Games has built a game that allows a sense of adventure, and push your luck dynamics. You play a dodo, building the best nest. Obviously, points are based on beauty, because of course, you are a dodo.

Gameplay Mechanics

You will be drawing from three adventure decks to build buying power, so that you can continue drawing from the adventure decks, and match symbols from dodo to resource, which allows you to build said dodo card. If unable to build a resource card, as you have not obtained the right dodo, you will lose of of your three hitpoints. Do not die, as we all know, Dodos never come back.

Some cards allow for special actions, such as taking the same action twice, or using one type of dodo, for a different type of resource. 

All in all, you are building towards a unique nesting area, 2×3, or 6 in total. If you build with all the same type terrain you will score one way, if you have sets of materials, you will score another way. Whichever score is highest, will be your game points.

Initial Impressions

When I first saw Dodoresque, it only slightly intrigued me, and mostly for art. I wanted to see it, but the theme did not yet interest me. 

Game Build Quality

The game is cards, and they are blue core cards, that are nice card stock, but slightly transparent if held up to a light. All in all, the game is functionally built well, and I have no hesitation in the game, based on build quality.

Artistic Direction

The really interesting part of the game is the theming of the art. 

The harder the mission the darker the card. It just makes literal and figurative sense. Not all art in games is created equally. Some art, does not feel like a part of the game at all. In Dodoresque, the art feels as if it is the game. 

In the sphere of art themification (I made that word up, take that Shakespheare!), there is no higher praise in game art, than saying the art fits the theme, and makes the game better. Dodoresque does this perfectly.

In terms of the satisfaction I get just looking at the art, it is fine, if a little over cutesy for me. But, with how it fits with the game, I cannot imagine other art.

Fun Factor

When I first played Dodoresque, I didn’t quite get the game. It seemed rather catty. It was not until I played it several times, that I realized how genuinely neat the idea is.

Age Range & Weight

8+. My 7 year old played this with me, and the only difficulty she has was building a point bearing nest. She understood the mechanics of the cards perfectly. So, with a bit of patience, I think she will, and other younger players will grasp the idea quickly.

Conclusions

You can rebuild your nest as much as you want until the last card is drawn. Once you make that final decision, you can look at your neighbor and more or less know who won.

The cleverness of this game, is like a dodo, at first glance, it does not appear clever at all, while hiding something that is quite unique underneath.  The cuteness of this game, hides a deeper game. Do not be fooled.

Tetrahedron Games is currently running a new Kickstarter, for Cherry Blossom, which looks great.

You can find it here: Cherry Blossom

If you want to check out Dodoresque, you can find it on Amazon: Dodoresque