Order of Invention – Breaking Games – Review

"Put simply, I was wrong in my initial impressions."

Theme and What is it?

Which came first?

  • My surprise that it is a lot of fun
  • An existential crisis for liking this game too much
  • My doubt this game would be fun
  • Our own rules that we find more entertaining

I have just spelled out for you this entire game. Though the basis for the carbon dating of the different age of things is based off of factual information about things you feel like you should know. How old is the Zamboni? Could you guess the age of the microchip? The first wireless phone? Heat transfer printing? Now that you have guessed relative ages, could you put them in order? How much would you be willing to wager to do that?

Welcome to the Order of Invention.

Gameplay Mechanics

This game is as simple as they come. You have four cards, each with a different thing on them. You must now place your order chips on them so that your neighbors do not know your guesses. Once all bets have been laid, the cards are turned over, and so are the bets.

For every correct answer you have, you get a VP. In future rounds, you can bet your VP for things you are very confident in. Whoever has the most VP after 5 rounds, wins.

Initial Impressions

Sometimes I embarrass myself by making a uninformed judgment about a game, prior to ever opening the box. This is exactly the case for Order of Invention. I did not like the game when it was first showed to me, and just seemed like yet another party game, without adding anything new or different.

Put simply, I was wrong in my initial impressions.

Game Build Quality

The game is simple cards, and simple cardboard. There is nothing substantial there, or needed. For that reason, I would give the build an A+, on the basis that it includes only what is needed, and only the quality that is needed for the fun to be had.

Artistic Direction

The art is goofy, and appropriate for the subject matter. It is not a serious game. The art also, does not take itself too seriously. All of the things I have seen so far, have been real things, and photos could have possibly been used, but Breaking Games made the choice to make sure that they did not take this too seriously, and that was a great artistic choice.

Fun Factor

I am going to paraphrase the couple I showed this game to, so you can see what this idea can do.

He was born in 1941, and he liked the idea that he should know all this information, and that you know what, he did not. He said it was all stuff that he felt he should know.

I have never seen a full grown man delight so much in being wrong. This is why almost immediately, the game changed from a score taking game, to a lets all work together to see how smart we are game. Both work, but being wrong as a group was a LOT of fun. We all felt dumb together. Sheer delight.

Age Range & Weight

8+. No doubt anyone 8+ could play this, my 7 year old could play this without much problem. The problem will present itself that not all kids will know what cellophane is, or even velcro. I would not want to play it with anyone under 20, for reason that knowing the items makes you feel like you know more than you do. The best part of the game is that you know the names, and feel like you should know how old they are. Unless you are a trivia wiz, trust me… you do not.

Conclusions

Breaking Games has a sleeper hit on their hands. Truthfully, the reason that most people will walk right past it, is that it is a party game. This is one party game that even our niche community could find joy in. If you cannot find joy in being wrong, then you may be a scrooge. Thank you Breaking Games for proving to me that my dad can actually be wrong. What a delight!