Rebel Nox – Review – Aporta Games

Theme and What is it?

Trick taking in the world of Capital Lux. When alliances that will determine your ability to win or lose are at stake, what could go wrong?

A beautiful card game, built on a solid premise. How does it stack up?

Gameplay Mechanics

Ultimately, this game is a trump trick taking game. You must follow suit if able, if unable, you may trump the last card. The higher the trump, the more likely you are to win. Except for the pesky assassin… 

The assassin kills the highest card. If there are more than one assassin, the top two highest cards will die, and so on. You know, most likely your assassin will not win the hand, but can you help someone in your alliance to win? This is where the hidden alliances and the social deduction come into play.

Are you on my alliance? If so, I’ll use my assassin to kill Bob, who I think is a rebel. Bob says he is not a rebel, but we all know, you cannot trust Bob.

Initial Impressions

First step in this analysis for me was, a name. I saw Kwanchai Moriya on the box.

I am a huge fan of his art, and become addicted upon the release of Kodama. If you look him up, some of your favorite game art is likely part of his imagination. Beyond that it is a simple card trick taking game. Simple right… what could go wrong…?

Game Build Quality

A card game. It has cards. These cards are good quality, and shuffle well. The additional pieces, are nice and work well. The build is as a good quality card game should be, a game that wants to be played, and does not feel like it must be sleeved to keep it pretty. 

Artistic Direction

Two words: Kwanchai Moriya

OK, I’m a fanboy of his art. It looks like I always imagine in my head, my art should look, if I had talent. I do not.

This art brings me into a alternate world, that of Capital Lux, and that is a good thing. The art is vibrant, feels like something you have seen before, all the while knowing it is something entirely new. 

Fun Factor

You win, when your team has enough people on it, and enough followers for the game to say you won. It feels fidgety to say, but in the game works well. The bigger the team, the more followers you need to win. 

Where the frustration is, you have no idea who you are playing against for the win. I could enjoy the game perhaps more on a single round basis. 

With that being said, taking away followers from someone at the table, only to realize they are on your team, is such a fantastically horrible feeling that it could only be accomplished with not knowing they are on your team.

Age Range & Weight

12+ Call me a prude, but I tend to think any game that regularly uses an assassin mechanism is probably for an older audience from the start.

This is not because game “death” bothers me, but because I have played enough games with a younger audience to know how poorly they take it. For that reason, 12+ is probably ideal.

Conclusions

The game is beautiful, for me that is not even an arguable point.

I wanted to like it more than I did. Not knowing who I was playing against, made winning feel rather arbitrary.That arbitrariness would feel perfect over a few drinks, but at the game table, I want to know if I have a chance of winning.

So, for that reason, my delight in this game is highly going to depend on when and where I would be playing it. I want to beat up my friends over a couple beers at a bar, while I am a rebel. Hopefully the cards are water resistant, and my friends are frustration resistant, as I plan on winning.