Tomb of Annihilation by WizKids: Painting Poorly – Stone Juggernaut

It's the Juggernaut...

Happy New Year to all of you MeepleGamers out there!  Mike Meeple is here today with another tutorial for our Tomb of Annihilation series, and it’s a great starting point for any of you out there who made the New Year’s Resolution of learning how to paint miniatures!

Today, we’re going to be going over the deceptively simple Stone Juggernaut!

The Stone Juggernaut looks complicated because of the INCREDIBLE detail put into the sculpt (I mean, just LOOK at all the engraving!), but it’s actually one of the simplest paint jobs you could ever accomplish.  I will be following mostly the steps from my blog article about how to paint BIG FIGS, so if you’re new, I suggest you start there.

Let’s get to it!

1. Gameplan, Prep, and Prime

To me, the whole Tomb of Annihilation game just reminds me a of a Mayan or Aztec feel, and whenever I think of those cultures, I think of jade for some reason (if you are of the descent of either of those cultures, and you think I’m an idiot for thinking that, you are absolutely correct).

Since we’re dealing with a big figure, we’re going to be brushing on three different colors of green in varying tones to create depth and highlights without having to use any washes, and we’ll be doing something similar with the roller portions of the Juggernaut, only with gray.

As you can see, both my greens and my grays start off dark and slowly get lighter, and that’s the order we will be applying them as well, in order to properly highlight the figure.

For this bad boy, I have actually sprung for another color of primer!  I’ve gone ahead and primed it with Matt Black by The Army Painter, and this will not only prime the mini, but also give us a great basecolor to build all other lighter colors, green or gray, on top of.

2. The Chassis

Once again, we will be thinning our paints out with water in a roughly 50/50 ratio.  But we will be using a different brush…

As you can see, I’m using my wedge brush, and I’ve loaded it up fairly decently with paint.  I’m going to be using a technique that I call Wetbrushing (but if you know the real name for it, please let me know) which is similar to drybrushing, but with more paint on your brush.

You’re going to load up your brush with your darkest green paint like shown above, and you are going to be lightly brushing across the figure’s details, or “Against the Grain” if you will.

As you can see, it adds color to the figure, while the black primer starts to give it some natural depth.

You’ll wetbrush the entire chassis with your darkest green, and it should look something like above.  Don’t worry if you get some green on the rollers, like I did.  We’re going to be painting over them anyway.

Once the first coat is dry, you’ll repeat the process again and again with your subsequent lighter shades of green, but you’ll be using less and less paint each time.

3. The Rollers

Hey, guys, if you’ve made it this far, you can go the whole way!  We’re almost done!

With our rollers, we are going to be doing the EXACT same thing as what we did with our chassis, except with gray.  We’ll be starting off by wetbrushing on this darker gray (but not quite black) ash shown above, and once that’ dries…

We’ll be brushing on our lighter gray the same way.

In order to keep the rollers looking round, only apply the lighter gray to the front and top of the rollers.  This helps create the illusion of shadow underneath the rollers.

5. Steamroll the Competition!

That’s IT!  SUPER easy today, and a great way to start off your Adventures in Miniatures Painting!

Hopefully you found this helpful, and you can always find all of my tutorials on my blog, including all of the previous entries for Tomb of Annihilation.  Make sure you keep checking in here at MeepleGamers and on my blog because there will be new tutorials for Tomb of Annihilation posted on a bi-weekly basis!  Until next time, Adventurers!

 

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